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Mighty Mehrangarh, the muscular fort that towers over the Blue City of Jodhpur, is a magnificent spectacle and an architectural masterpiece. Around Mehrangarh’s base, the old city, a jumble of Brahmin-blue cubes, stretches out to the 10km-long, 16th-century city wall. The Blue City really is blue! Inside is a tangle of winding, glittering, medieval streets, which never seem to lead where you expect them to, scented by incense, roses and sewers, with shops and bazaars selling everything from trumpets and temple decorations to snuff and saris.

Traditionally, blue signified the home of a Brahmin, but non-Brahmins have got in on the act too. As well as glowing with a mysterious light, the blue tint is thought to repel insects.

Modern Jodhpur stretches well beyond the city walls, but it’s the immediacy and buzz of the old Blue City and the larger-than life fort that capture travellers’ imaginations. This crowded, hectic zone is also Jodhpur’s main tourist area, and it often seems you can’t speak to anyone without them trying to sell you something. Areas of the old city further west, such as Navchokiya, are just as atmospheric, with far less hustling.

Jaswant Thada
Close to the fort complex, lies Jaswant Thada. This 19th century royal cenotaph built in white marble in commemoration of Maharaja Jaswant Singh II and three other cenotaphs, stand nearby. The cenotaph of Maharaja Jaswant Singh holds the rare portraits of the rulers and Maharajas of Jodhpur. A visit inside the cenotaphs, with some villagers of the region, would bring forward the reverence they still hold for their brave kings

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Umaid Bhawan Palace
The romantic looking Umaid Bhawan Palace was actually built with the purpose of giving employment to the people of Jodhpur during a long drawn famine. The royal family of Jodhpur still lives in a part of the palace.Another part of the palace houses a well-maintained museum, displaying an amazing array of items belonging to the Maharaja and the royal family – weapons, antiques & fascinating clocks, crockery and trophies

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Mandor 
Towards the north of Jodhpur is the ancient capital of Marwar, Mandor. It is just 8 Kms from the city. Main attractions of the place are hall of Heroes where sixteen huge figures which have been carved out of a single rock, the shrine of 330 million Gods and the royal cenotaphs. This area is of immense historical importance but what makes it worthy of a visit is the Hall of Heroes. Sixteen gigantic figures carved out of a single rock depicting popular Hindu and folk deities stand there in bright colours and are well maintained. But one can not miss the caves in crags and the sprawling gardens, which are now shelter place for monkeys and peacocks. Greenery of the place makes Mandor, in true sense, an oasis.

 

Balsammand Lake & Palace

Many a times you must have dreamt of staying in a huge, royal palace on the sea-shore or on the banks of river or if not both at least a palace facing the water reservoir. There is such a place at Mandor in Rajasthan .The 19th Century sandstone palace built on a hillock facing Balsammand lake is one of such places that’s definitely going to win your heart.

 

 

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